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My happiest day of my life was when I gave birth to my daughter. There were only boys in my husband's family until then, she was the first girl. Her name was Gloria.

Photographs by Sven Torfinn.

I was bathing the children when I heard gunfire. We left half an hour after hearing the first shots, the children still naked. The houses had already been burned down and people killed. Some were beaten on the road as we fled and pregnant women had their bellies torn open. I hid while other women were raped.

On the journey, my uncle carried my daughter. He was walking behind me, and then he called out – your baby died. I stopped and waited. She had been shot and was covered in blood. We buried her in a field. I don’t know whether the field belonged to someone. When we got to Bulengo, my second child became ill. He died as well.

Things would be better if I was working. I left behind six goats, two chickens and one hectare of land where I used to grow beans and potatoes. I earned three times as much from the farm as from my job as a primary school teacher, but losing my diploma in the fire was worse than abandoning the land because my learning is always with me wherever I go.
Rachel
Bulengo IDP camp, DRC
Bulengo IDP camp, DRC
Rachel
Rachel
Bulengo IDP camp, DRC
Bulengo IDP camp, DRC
Rachel
Rachel
Bulengo IDP camp, DRC
Bulengo IDP camp, DRC
Rachel