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Hawa isn't my daughter, she's my niece. I adopted her because my little brother conceived her outside of marriage. Her mother brought her to me when she was a tiny newborn and hasn't seen her since. But her father visits.

Photographs by Espen Rasmussen.

I couldn't understand why Hawa was sick and some days I was so depressed I almost lost hope. But we stayed at the IRC health centre for 15 days and kept visiting the clinic for another 45, and I began to see her condition improve. She is almost completely well now.

When I talk to my husband it's about practical things. We discuss the children's health, food and money issues. When the women get together and chat, we don’t mingle with the men. We discuss social events like weddings and naming ceremonies.

My great-grandmother leads the conversation because she is so wise. She talks about the days when she was growing up and children would go inside and hide when the adults were talking. Now the kids don't listen to us when we tell them something, they just run around making a noise.

The old days were much better because food was plentiful. Today finding enough money and enough to eat is always a struggle. I wonder what will happen tomorrow? Will things be even harder than today? But life itself is difficult, all over the world. I think people experience the same problems everywhere.

Nia
Sirakoro Niare, Mali
Sirakoro Niare, Mali
Nia
Nia
Sirakoro Niare, Mali
Sirakoro Niare, Mali
Nia
Nia
Sirakoro Niare, Mali
Sirakoro Niare, Mali
Nia